Sunday, March 15, 2009

U.S. Tax Court

Post an anonymous comment with information regarding clerkship interviews, hirings, vacancies, and the like, regarding the U.S. Tax Court.

15 comments:

  1. Here is a repost of the comments from last yr's blog, at least one of which appears to be helpful:

    Anonymous said...
    CURRENT CLERKSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

    Check the Tax Court's website for current openings for clerskships with Judges, Senior Judges and Special Trial Judges. As of this year, President Bush has nominated, and the U.S. Senate has confirmed, three new Judges on the Tax Court who are currently hiring their first set of clerks.

    COMPETITIVENESS

    Tax Court clerkships with Judges and Senior Judges are roughly as competitive as Federal District Court clerkships in Washington D.C., except that tax credentials are a virtual requirement. Without an LL.M. in Tax from a top 3 program or significant tax law experience in a big law firm, chances of an offer are slim to none.

    Tax Court clerkships with Special Trial Judges are roughly as competitive as Federal Magistrate clerkships in Washington, D.C., except that tax credentials are a virtual requirement. Special Trial Judges are probably less likely to compromise on having an LL.M. in Tax than Judges or Senior Judges, because they are only allotted one clerk apiece, like Magistrate Judges in the Federal District Court.

    COMPENSATION

    Law clerks with an LL.M. and/or relevant legal experience are eligible for significantly higher pay, and Tax Court clerkships are among the highest paid clerkships. See the Tax Court website for more details.

    LOCATION

    All Tax Court clerks reside and work in Washington, D.C., although their Judges will often "ride circuit" to hear cases across the country before returning to the Tax Court to author their decision or confer with other Tax Court Judges.

    August 11, 2008 3:06 PM
    Anonymous said...
    Due to their location in DC and ridiculously high pay, Tax Court clerkships are more competitive than most CoA clerkships.

    May 20, 2009 3:15 PM
    Anonymous said...
    Mere mortals need not apply.

    May 22, 2009 2:54 PM

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  2. Anyone know of the possiblity of an experienced tax attorney (less than 5 yrss) with a tax LL.M. from a top 3 program, to receive a Court of Appeals Clerskhip AFTER completing US Tax court clerkship? Can you please provide details?

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  3. Your chances would be comparable to those of an experienced applicant who previously clerked for a Federal District Court in a desirable location (e.g., NYC or DC). I personally know of one person, with credentials similar to yours, who had an offer to clerk for a Federal Court of Appeals after clerking for the Tax Court, but turned it down.

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  4. What if you're trying to do the reverse? Do Tax Court Judges respect federal appellate clerkships? Would you have a good shot at a Tax Court clerkship if you previously clerked for a Court of Appeals?

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  5. How many clerks does each judge hire?

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  6. Judges (i.e., active, presidentially appointed) hire 2 law clerks. Most Senior Judges (i.e., Judges who took senior status) hire 1 law clerk apiece, but if they have a full docket, some hire 2 law clerks. Special Trial Judges (i.e. magistrates appointed by the Chief Judge) hire 1 law clerk apiece.

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  7. When do most of the judges post their openings?

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  8. The Tax Court website lists available clerkship opportunities. In addition, sometimes the judge's bio will say if they are looking to hire a clerk. Top LLM programs will have this information as well.

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  9. Yeah but only 2 are listed. When do they usually get posted? Early fall? Later in the summer?

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  11. Just got a call for a phone interview to start in 2013. If you applied, keep your phones on you! Good luck!

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    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Would you mind sharing your stats?

      Delete
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